Górnośląsko-Zagłębiowska Metropolia invites you to participate in the conference

On Tuesday, September 13, the Silesian Museum in Katowice will host a conference on nuclear energy and energy transformation of coal regions.

The event is addressed both to representatives of local governments, as well as anyone interested in energy transformation, including specialists in the field of energy. The event will be held in person and online.

Participation in the conference is free, however, prior registration is required. The conference will be held in Polish with simultaneous translation into English, and streaming in Polish and English.

read on

Climate change forces us to change the way we generate electricity and heat. This transformation should be just and must not come at the expense of local communities that flourished in coal regions. According to the Polish Academy of Sciences, apart from a significant expansion of renewable energy sources, we will also need nuclear power to be able to supply entire metropolises in a cheap and weather-independent manner.

On September 13, we will talk about specific opportunities available to local governments and local businesses in this area, how to talk to local communities about nuclear power, and what lessons can be learned from countries where such a transformation has already begun.

  • Is nuclear energy an opportunity for the energy transformation of coal regions?
  • Is it an opportunity to obtain cheap, clean, and sustainable energy in the current situation on international markets?
  • Or perhaps it is a must to achieve low-carbon goals?
  • Why should local governments be interested in the development of nuclear energy?

Time

  • September 13, 2022
  • 9 a.m. - 3.30 p.m.

Venue

  • Silesian Museum in Katowice
  • ul. Dobrowolskiego 1
  • 40-205 Katowice
  • Auditorium hall, level: -4

Contact

  • Department of Infrastructure and Environment
    Górnośląsko-Zagłębiowska Metropolia Office
  • ph. +48 32 718 07 40, e-mail: is@metropoliagzm.pl

Conference topics

  • SaHo model – cheap, clean, and sustainable energy for local governments
    "Both large and small nuclear projects can be implemented based on cooperative models. Finns and Americans have been implementing their projects in a similar way for decades. How to use this type of models in Poland without burdening local governments with investment risk, and secure much cheaper capital? How can local governments use cheap electricity from a nuclear power plant even if it is located in another province?"

    Bożena Horbaczewska, PhD, Assistant Professor, Warsaw School of Economics
    Łukasz Sawicki, Chief Specialist, Ministry of Climate and Environment
  • Shift from coal to nuclear power in the USA
    US local authorities have extensive experience in the transition from coal to nuclear power. What are the benefits, what to avoid, and how to reduce the risk of such projects?

    Mark Nelson, Managing Director of Radiant Energy Fund
  • Preparations for the construction of the first nuclear power plant in Poland
    How to talk to residents about nuclear energy? What advantages and arguments speak for the implementation of such projects?

    Joanna Szostek, Deputy Director Communication and Stakeholder’s Management Division, Polskie Elektrownie Jądrowe Sp. z o.o.
  • How to prevent nuclear power projects from falling flat? - ABC of public consultations
    discussion panel

    Tomasz Nowacki PhD, Director of the Department of Nuclear Energy, Ministry of Climate and Environment,
    Sławomir Krenczyk, Board Member the Casimir Pulaski Foundation,
    Joanna Szostek, Deputy Director Communication and Stakeholder’s Management Division, Polskie Elektrownie Jądrowe Sp. z o.o.

 

  • Is SMR a basis or an addition to the future power industry?
    discussion panel

    Adam Rajewski, Assistant Lecturer, Warsaw University of Technology,
    Mark Nelson, Managing Director Radiant Energy Fund,
    Andrzej Sikora, PhD Eng., CEO of The Energy Studies Institute
  • DEsire project: A plan to decarbonize the domestic power industry through modernization based on the use of nuclear reactors

    Łukasz Bartela, Associate Professor Eng., Silesian University of Technology
  • Is nuclear power an opportunity for the energy transformation of coal regions?
    local government panel

    Paweł Adamów, Deputy Mayor of the City of Konin,
    Janusz Koper, Deputy Mayor of the City of Rybnik, Chairman of the Regional Energy Council,
    Karolina Mucha-Kuś PhD, Director of the Projects and Investments Department, Górnośląsko - Zagłębiowska Metropolia,
    Tomasz Nowacki PhD, Director of the Nuclear Energy Department, Ministry of Climate and Environment

Speakers and moderators

Moderators: Adam Błażowski, Justyna Piszczatowska

Agenda

  • 09:00 a.m. – 9:10 a.m
    Welcome

    Kazimierz Karolczak, Chairman of the Management Board of Górnośląsko-Zagłębiowska Metropolia
    Mariusz Skiba, Deputy Mayor of Katowice
  • 09:10 a.m. – 09:20 a.m.
    Opening speech

    Prof. Jerzy Buzek Eng., Member of the European Parliament
  • 09:20 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
    SaHo model – cheap, clean, and sustainable energy for local governments "Both large and small nuclear projects can be implemented based on cooperative models. Finns and Americans have been implementing their projects in a similar way for decades. How to use this type of models in Poland without burdening local governments with investment risk, and secure much cheaper capital? How can local governments use cheap electricity from a nuclear power plant even if it is located in another province?"

    Bożena Horbaczewska, PhD, Assistant Professor, Warsaw School of Economics
    Łukasz Sawicki, Chief Specialist, Ministry of Climate and Environment
  • 10:20 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
    Shift from coal to nuclear power in the USA US local authorities have extensive experience in the transition from coal to nuclear power. What are the benefits, what to avoid, and how to reduce the risk of such projects?

    Mark Nelson, Managing Director of Radiant Energy Fund
  • 10:50 a.m. – 11:10 a.m.
    Coffee break
  • 11:10 a.m. – 11:40 a.m.
    Preparations for the construction of the first nuclear power plant in Poland How to talk to residents about nuclear energy? What advantages and arguments speak for the implementation of such projects?

    Joanna Szostek, Deputy Director Communication and Stakeholder’s Management Division, Polskie Elektrownie Jądrowe Sp. z o.o.
  • 11:40 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
    Position of the Polish Academy of Sciences on renewable energy sources and nuclear power

    Prof. Szymon Malinowski, Director of the Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw
  • 11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
    How to prevent nuclear power projects from falling flat? - ABC of public consultations discussion panel

    Tomasz Nowacki PhD, Director of the Nuclear Energy Department, Ministry of Climate and Environment,
    Sławomir Krenczyk, Board Member the Casimir Pulaski Foundation,
    Joanna Szostek, Deputy Director Communication and Stakeholder’s Management Division, Polskie Elektrownie Jądrowe Sp. z o.o.
  • 12:30 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
    Is SMR a basis or an addition to the future power industry? discussion panel

    Adam Rajewski, Assistant Lecturer, Warsaw University of Technology
    Mark Nelson, Managing Director Radiant Energy Fund,
    Andrzej Sikora, PhD Eng., CEO of The Energy Studies Institute
  • 1:15 – 2:00 p.m.
    Lunch
  • 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    DEsire project: A plan to decarbonize the domestic power industry through modernization based on the use of nuclear reactors

    Łukasz Bartela, Associate Professor Eng., Silesian University of Technology
  • 2:30 p.m.– 3:30 p.m.
    Local government session: Is nuclear power an opportunity for the energy transformation of coal regions

    Paweł Adamów, Deputy Mayor of the City of Konin,
    Janusz Koper, Deputy Mayor of the City of Rybnik, Chairman of the Regional Energy Council,
    Karolina Mucha-Kuś, Director of the Projects and Investments Department, Górnośląsko - Zagłębiowska Metropolia,
    Tomasz Nowacki PhD, Director of the Nuclear Energy Department, Ministry of Climate and Environment

Register for the conference

To complete the registration, check your e-mail box and confirm your participation in the conference. If you do not see the e-mail, check your “junk mail” folder or “spam” folder.
FREE ENTRANCE
Silesian Museum
ul. Dobrowolskiego 1
Katowice
Auditorium hall, level: -4

FAQ

  • Is participation in the conference free for everyone?
    Yes, the conference is open to everyone. It is possible to participate inperson or online. Please choose the correct option when filling in the form.
  • Will participants receive a certificate of participation in the conference?
    Anyone who needs such a certificate is asked to send a request to: is@metropoliagzm.pl. It will also be possible to receive a business trip confirmation on site
  • Is it an onsite conference?
    Yes, the conference will be held at the Silesian Museum in Katowice, Poland. Participants can join either in person or online. Please choose the correct option when filling in the form.
  • What are the current pandemic restrictions?
    Current restrictions slowing the spread of SARS-CoV-2 are available here: : https://www.gov.pl/web/koronawirus/aktualne-zasady-i-ograniczenia
  • How to get to the conference venue by public transport?
    The conference will be held at the Silesian Museum in Katowice, Poland, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1.

    The Silesian Museum is located near Spodek Arena, a site formerly occupied by Katowice Coal Mine (ul. Dobrowolskiego 1), now a Culture Zone made up of several other institutions.

    Getting to the venue. Nearly 30 bus and tram lines to choose from. Nearby ZTM stops are: Katowice Strefa Kultury and Katowice Strefa Kultury NOSPR (buses) or Katowice Rondo (trams).

    Nearest bus stop: Katowice Strefa Kultury Muzeum Śląskie, line 940.

    We recommend using the ZTM connection search engine: https://rj.metropoliaztm.pl/

    Or Jak dojadę search engine: https://jakdojade.pl/katowice/trasa/?tc=50.2650765:19.036050799999998

    Rail
    The Silesian Museum is within 25 minutes' walking distance from the railway station in the direction of Rondo stop, Spodek Arena and the International Congress Center.

    The Silesian Museum, Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1
  • What languages ​​will the conference be held in?
    The conference will be conducted in Polish with simultaneous translation into English.
Is participation in the conference free for everyone?

Yes, the conference is open to everyone.
It is possible to participate inperson or online.
Please choose the correct option when filling in the form.
Will participants receive a certificate of participation in the conference?

Anyone who needs such a certificate is asked to send a request to: is@metropoliagzm.pl.
It will also be possible to receive a business trip confirmation on site
Is it an onsite conference?

Yes, the conference will be held at the Silesian Museum in Katowice, Poland.
Participants can join either in person or online.
Please choose the correct option when filling in the form.
What are the current pandemic restrictions?

Current restrictions slowing the spread of SARS-CoV-2 are available here: : https://www.gov.pl/web/koronawirus/aktualne-zasady-i-ograniczenia
How to get to the conference venue by public transport?

The conference will be held at the Silesian Museum in Katowice, Poland, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1.

The Silesian Museum is located near Spodek Arena, a site formerly occupied by Katowice Coal Mine (ul. Dobrowolskiego 1), now a Culture Zone made up of several other institutions.

Getting to the venue. Nearly 30 bus and tram lines to choose from. Nearby ZTM stops are: Katowice Strefa Kultury and Katowice Strefa Kultury NOSPR (buses) or Katowice Rondo (trams).

Nearest bus stop: Katowice Strefa Kultury Muzeum Śląskie, line 940.

We recommend using the ZTM connection search engine: https://rj.metropoliaztm.pl/

Or Jak dojadę search engine: https://jakdojade.pl/katowice/trasa/?tc=50.2650765:19.036050799999998

Rail
The Silesian Museum is within 25 minutes' walking distance from the railway station in the direction of Rondo stop, Spodek Arena and the International Congress Center.

The Silesian Museum, Katowice, ul. T. Dobrowolskiego 1
What languages ​​will the conference be held in?

The conference will be conducted in Polish with simultaneous translation into English.

Nuclear power for local governments – 74% of Poles support the construction of nuclear power plants  

120 people participating in person, and over 300 following the online broadcast. The conference organized by the Upper Silesia and Zagłębie Metropolis created a platform for discussion that gathered experts, activists, and local government officials.

The event took place on Tuesday, September 13 in the attractive spaces of the Silesian Museum in Katowice. The online transmission was followed by participants from Poland, Germany, France, the USA, China, Finland, the Netherlands, Austria, Spain, and Sweden.

The originator and organizer of the event was the Upper Silesia and Zagłębie Metropolis, while the substantive part was taken care of by Adam Błażowski, an engineer and journalist who has been dealing with the topic of energy efficiency, and consulting on Smart City, CleanTech, distributed renewable energy and nuclear power for 15 years.

Is nuclear energy an opportunity for the energy transformation of coal regions? Or is it a necessity to achieve low-carbon goals? Why should local governments be interested in the development of nuclear energy? These are just a few of the questions that the organizers asked the participants.

- Energy security is also the responsibility of local governments. The current fuel crisis shows how important energy independence is. Modular nuclear units can be an alternative to conventional energy sources. Perhaps they could supply electricity to the cities of the Metropolis. We keep our fingers crossed for the development of this technology - said Kazimierz Karolczak, Chairman of the Board of the Upper Silesia and Zagłębie Metropolis.

The opening speech was delivered by prof. Jerzy Buzek, Member of the European Parliament. - Nuclear is not the only solution, but there is no solution without nuclear. EU plans for an urgent shift away from fossil fuels from Russia have led many EU countries to revise their approach to nuclear energy. Recent polls show a significant increase in support for nuclear energy, even in Germany. The energy self-sufficiency of  local governments in Poland may also be based on investments in nuclear power plants, although this requires support at the national level and it is not an easy choice - noted prof. Buzek.

The position of the Polish Academy of Sciences on renewable energy and nuclear power was presented to conference participants by prof. Symons Malinowski, Director of the Institute of Geophysics at the University of Warsaw. - Of all non-emission sources, nuclear energy is the best in terms of availability, that is, the ability to produce energy at the time when we want to use it. It also produces heat that could be used in district heating networks. It is environmentally friendly because it only emits greenhouse gases during the construction phase, the professor noted. - Nuclear energy can make us independent from fossil fuel extractors. There would be no war in Ukraine if we did not buy huge amounts of energy resources from Russia. Nuclear energy, along with wind and solar energy, is our future. We must remember about a just transition. Nuclear power must be managed by people, and local governments, not by large companies, said Malinowski.

Dr. Buena Horbaczewska from the Warsaw School of Economics and Łukasz Sawicki, chief specialist at the Department of Nuclear Energy of the Ministry of Climate and Environment, presented the SaHo model in which the state builds a nuclear power plant and then sells it to end users. They have the right and obligation to take energy at the cost of production. Energy is consumed in proportion to ownership share. Sale of electricity without margin means low costs for consumers - without producer profit, capacity fee, and outside the energy market. The concept uses mechanisms such as the Polish industrial power generation (where plants generate electricity for their own needs), or cooperative models which exist in Finland and the USA.

Mark Nelson, co-author of the "Repowering Coal" report, was the special guest at the conference. - US nuclear power plants require an average of 0.7 employees per megawatt of power, while coal-fired power plants employ an average of 0.15 employees per megawatt. Moreover, nuclear power plants built today will operate for at least 80 years, which means that local communities can enjoy the benefits of investing in nuclear energy for almost a hundred years, the report says.

- Research carried out by the Ministry of Climate and Environment shows that support for the construction of nuclear power plants in Poland is the highest in 10 years. 74% of respondents support this solution - noted Joanna Szostek, Deputy Director of the Communication and Stakeholder Relations Division of Polskie Elektrownie Jądrowe.

- This support is largely related to the current geopolitical situation in the world. Price increases, and shortage of energy resources (which are the basis of energy security) do not provide much scope for optimism in the future - noted Blanka Romanowska, Director of the Department of Infrastructure and Environment of the Upper Silesia and Zagłębie Metropolis

Transport

  • Silesian Museum in Katowice
  • ul. Dobrowolskiego 1
  • 40-205 Katowice

Media sponsors

METROPOLITAN ENERGY DAYS

Department of Infrastructure and Environment
Górnośląsko-Zagłębiowska Metropolia Office

ph. +48 32 718 07 40
e-mail: is@metropoliagzm.pl

Górnośląsko-Zagłębiowska Metropolia 2023